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The Ohio Patrolmen's Benevolent Association (O.P.B.A)

Job Announcement



Job Announcement

POLICE OFFICER


The City of Miamisburg, Ohio (pop. 20,000) is accepting applications for the full-time position of Police Officer.  All applicants must be at least 21 years of age;  possess a valid Ohio driver’s license; have no felony record; and possess a minimum of a high school diploma or equivalent (associate’s or bachelor’s degree is preferred).

Applicants who are not currently a certified peace officer must successfully complete a written Civil Service exam and a physical fitness assessment.  The Civil Service exam will be administered on Saturday, October 11, 2014.  The physical fitness assessment will be administered on Thursday, October 23, 2014.  The locations and times of the testings will be provided at a later date.

Applicants who are currently a certified peace officer with a minimum of one year of full-time law enforcement employment are not required to complete the written exam or physical fitness assessment to be considered for employment.  Prior service will be taken into consideration towards starting pay and leave benefits.

The compensation package includes a pay range of $24.36 - $31.97 per hour with excellent benefits.

To apply, submit completed City Application and Personal History Questionnaire to City of Miamisburg Human Resources, 10 N. First Street, Miamisburg, Ohio 45342 by 5:00 PM on Friday, September 30, 2014.  Visit the Employment Section of the City’s website at www.ci.miamisburg.oh.us for application materials, an important process sheet, and other necessary detailed informational documents.


Equal Opportunity Employer

 

Understanding Annuities Life is confusing…and so are annuities!

The complexity of modern day life seems to add to confusion, and annuities are no exception. There are many types of annuities and the variations of them continually evolve, making them even more confusing.  Before you consider using an annuity in your deferred compensation plan or other retirement planning, make sure you understand the benefits, costs, and surrender charge period. Not all annuities are created equal. Annuities can provide valuable benefits, but there are typically costs associated with these benefits. As with any investment decision, you need to make certain it is appropriate for your unique circumstances.

There are basically two types of annuities: deferred annuities and immediate annuities. A deferred annuity defers payment, while an immediate annuity begins payment immediately. While this is pretty simple, from this point, annuities get very complex. There are many variations, and they are changing all the time.

If a concern of yours is to help manage your principal from potential losses associated with downturns in the market, annuities can be used to help manage risk. We tend to think that principal protection is always a financial goal that should be considered, but it is even more important as you enter into retirement.

If providing yourself with an income stream is a goal, an immediate annuity might fit into your plan. When you buy an immediate income annuity you are buying an insurance product in which you exchange a lump sum for guaranteed payments for life or a period of time. This may help you manage two big retirement risks: a down market or outliving your money.

Have you used an annuity in your retirement planning, or are you considering using one in the future?  If you have further questions on the various types and features of annuities, feel free to give us a call.

Lineweaver Financial Group w 9035 Sweet Valley DrivewValley View, OH 44125w216.520.1711

Securities offered through Sigma Financial Corporation. Member FINRA/SIPC. Lineweaver Financial Group is independent of Sigma Financial Corporation.

Some fixed annuities come with high guaranteed interest rates that can decrease after a set number of years to a much lower minimum interest rate determined by law.

Investors can lose principal if an indexed annuity is terminated prior to the end of the surrender period.

The principal guarantee and income for life guarantee features of fixed annuities are subject to the claims-paying ability of the issuing company.

If you take an early distribution from an annuity you may be subject to a surrender charge which could result in a loss of principal.  You may also be subject to a tax penalty if you make a withdrawal before age 59.5.

 

 

The Hopper Act: An Added Protection for Officer Safety

By:  Sherri Bevan Walsh

In January 2011, Clark County Sheriff’s Deputy Suzanne Hopper was shot and killed responding to a call at a trailer park. The shooting suspect had a history of mental illness and had been declared criminally insane in 2002. Deputy Hopper would have radioed for back-up had she known that the suspect was unstable, but she had no way of obtaining this information. Her death did not go unnoticed. It spurred new legislation that requires a defendant’s history of mental illness to be disclosed in the National Crime Information Center (NCIC).

The new legislation, known as the “Deputy Suzanne Hopper Act” (or “Hopper Act” for short), became effective on September 4, 2013. The act amended O.R.C. 2945.402 and added O.R.C. 2929.44 to require courts to report information concerning a criminal’s mental illness. There are three items that must be reported to the original law enforcement agency involved.

First, mental health evaluations or treatment orders for a person convicted of a violent offense must be disclosed. If a person pleads guilty or is convicted of an offense of violence, the court may order that a mental evaluation be conducted. The evaluation results and any corresponding treatment must be reported to NCIC Supervised Release File through LEADS. The information reported and entered must include: (1) the name of the court providing the information, (2) the offense or offenses of violence to which the offender pleaded guilty or of which the offender was convicted, and (3) any other information required for the entry of information into the NCIC Supervised Release File.

Second, the conditional release of a person found incompetent to stand trial must be reported. If a court approves a conditional release for a person found incompetent to stand trial, the court must report to the local law enforcement agency all information pertaining to the release. This information must be entered into the NCIC Supervised Release File through LEADS. The information entered must include: (1) the name of the court providing the information, (2) the offense or offenses with which the person was charged, (3) whether the person was found Not Guilty by Reason of Insanity or Incompetent to Stand Trial with no substantial probability of becoming competent even with a course of treatment, (4) the reason for the conditional release, and (5) any other information required for the entry of information into the NCIC Supervised Release File.

Third, a finding of not guilty by reason of insanity must be disclosed. Similar to the second reporting requirement, if a court approves a conditional release for a person found Not Guilty by Reason of Insanity who has been committed, the court must report all information stated above pertaining to the release.

If the defendant has contact with law enforcement after the information has been entered into NCIC, law enforcement shall report the contact to the Department of Mental Health and any agency, person or office providing medical treatment. The mental health information added to the databases should remain on file until termination of the conditional release or commitment.

Beginning Jan. 1, 2014, courts are to use Form 95: NCIC Mental Health Notice to report this information. The original law enforcement agency is then responsible for entering the mental health information into NCIC so that local officers can access it when needed. Law enforcement must access NCIC information through LEADS.

The Hopper Act’s goal is to provide law enforcement with potentially life-saving information. By providing law enforcement with a violent offender’s mental health issues, responding officers can take appropriate precautions to ensure everyone’s safety.

This article is not to be considered legal advice. Please consult your police legal advisor regarding any legal issue.

Sherri Bevan Walsh

Summit County Prosecuting Attorney

 

CELL PHONE SEARCH AND SEIZURE ISSUES -- TWO IMPORTANT SUPREME COURT CASES TO WATCH IN THE WEEKS AHEAD

Max Rieker, Esq.

On April 29, 2014, the United States Supreme Court heard oral arguments in two cases involving warrantless searches of arrestees’ cellular phones.  For the most part, Fourth Amendment review cases by the Supreme Court do not get much attention.  Members of news media are far more interested in hot-button social issues than the minutiae of search and seizure litigation.  However, the cases of United States. v. Wurie (13-212) and Riley v. California (13-132) are of such import that every cell-phone carrying American should take notice of their outcome.  Law enforcement officers should pay particular attention as they will be bound by these Supreme Court decisions which are expected to be released in June.

When most practicing lawyers and current law enforcement professionals were trained, the warrantless search and seizure analyses were largely centered around the concepts of “stop-and-frisk,” “vehicle inventory searches,” the “Plain View Doctrine,” consent searches, the “emergency circumstance exception,” “searches incident to a lawful arrest,” and the like.  Since that time, technology has advanced both in the area of potential law enforcement capabilities and in personal electronic device capability, both of which have greatly complicated the warrantless search equation for all involved.

For instance the decision in Kyllo v. United States, 533 U.S. 27, 121 S. Ct. 2038 (2001), expressly prohibited law enforcement from using thermal imaging technology aimed at a private home from a public street without a lawful warrant to do so.  In Kyllo, the Department of the Interior used a thermal imaging device to detect that a suspect was using high-intensity heat lamps to perpetuate his marijuana growing operation.  Justice Scalia delivered the holding of the split Court,

Where, as here, the Government uses a device that is not in general public use, to explore details of the home that would previously have been unknowable without physical intrusion, the surveillance is a ‘search’ and is presumptively unreasonable without a warrant.[1]

When Kyllo was released, 53% of American adults owned a cellular phone.[2] These devices tended to be very basic in nature.[3] In 2014, 90% of all American adults own a cellular phone.[4] Of these phones, 58% of them are sophisticated “smartphones” which are essentially hand-held computer.[5] These devices have the ability to receive, store, and transmit fantastic amounts of data.  The public uses these devices to advance any number of business endeavors, including crime.

The basic question pending before the Court is whether the government must obtain a warrant to search data on the cell phone of a person under arrest.  This is a question which must balance the legitimate concerns of law enforcement against the private interest of one’s reasonable expectation of privacy.  Where does one interest end and the other interest begin with respect to the information contained on an arrestee’s cell phone?  Should a cell phone, as a receptacle of information, be treated any differently than a common wallet, purse, brief case, or clothing pocket; or because of its nature as device which often interacts with every aspect of a person’s life, are its contents off-limits to a warrantless search?  The Court must also be cognizant that its decision on cell phones will carry far-reaching implications with warrantless searches of other electronic devices.

In the case of Riley v. California, college student David Riley was arrested in San Diego on a traffic violation.[6] He was driving with an expired registration and with a suspended license.  During the vehicle inventory search, he was found to have hidden loaded firearms under the hood of his car.  Arresting officers searched the contents of his smartphone (pictures, videos, text messages, contacts, etc.).  This data led to the realization that he was part of an organized crime syndicate and it was discovered that Riley was connected with a prior drive-by shooting.  He was convicted in state court on various offenses and sentenced to 15 years imprisonment.

In the companion case, Brima Wurie was arrested in Boston for selling crack cocaine.[7] When questioned, he gave officers a false home address.  Through searching Wurie’s flip phone, officers were able to determine his correct home address and were able to obtain a search warrant.  When his home was searched, more drugs were discovered in addition to weapons and ammunition.  Wurie was convicted in federal court and sentenced to 22 years imprisonment.

In neither case was a warrant sought to search the arrestee’s phone.  Riley’s conviction was upheld.  Wurie’s was overturned in a divided decision by a federal Court of Appeals on the basis of the cell phone search.  The Supreme Court accepted both cases to resolve the conflicting judicial interpretations of the Fourth Amendment.

During oral argument, the justices seemed to be divided on how to reconcile the primary issues at play.  Responding to Riley’s attorney who argued in favor of limiting police authority, Justice Kennedy pointed out that criminals too “are more dangerous, more sophisticated, more elusive with cell phone” than they previously have been.[8] Conversely, Justice Scalia opined that the idea of allowing law enforcement officers to search a cell phone without a warrant after a seat belt violation is “absurd.”[9]

As a practical matter, what observers of this important issue wonder is whether the Court will create a bright-line rule that cell phone content is off-limits to warrantless search; whether the Court will create a bright-line rule that says the ability for a law enforcement officer to search cell phone content is just as permissive as the ability to search the contents of an arrestee’s wallet; or whether the Court will craft a rule somewhere between these two extremes.[10]

Some justices appear to favor a complete prohibition of such phone searches.  Some seem to favor permitting nearly unfettered access to law enforcement searches.  In light of his questions during oral arguments, it appears that Chief Justice Roberts would be inclined to create a new rule which would permit a warrantless search incident to arrest if the potential content of the device is somehow relevant to the purpose of the original arrest.   It will be interesting to see whether he can persuade a majority of his colleagues toward that position.  If Chief Justice Roberts’ apparent inclination comes to pass, it may be the fundamentally correct Fourth Amendment analysis, but would undoubtedly complicate an already complex issue.

The authors of the Fourth Amendment could not have possibly contemplated the concept of an iPhone when drafting the Bill of Rights, but they certainly understood expectations of personal privacy and the need for government to thwart crime.  The centuries-old debate moves forward into a new uncharted era.


[1] Kyllo v. United States, 533 U.S. 27, 121 S. Ct. 2038 (2001)

[2] Pew Research Center, The Web at 25 in the U.S. (Released February 27, 2014), citing Internet Project Surveys, 2000-2014 (http://www.pewinternet.org/files/2014/02/PIP_25th-anniversary-of-the-Web_022714_pdf.pdf)

[3] The first basic Blackberry model was released in 1999, but did not achieve wide-spread circulation for many years.  The first iPhone was released in 2007.

[4] Id.

[5] Id.

[6] Riley v. California, 134 S. Ct. 999, 187 L. Ed. 2d 847 (U.S. 2014).

[7] United States v. Wurie, 728 F.3d I (1st Cir. 2013).

[8] http://www.supremecourt.gov/oral_arguments/argument_transcripts/13-132_h315.pdf at 26.  Another issue to consider is law enforcement’s ability to retain, record, or otherwise preserve whatever evidence may be contained on a smartphone.  Today, phones can be remotely locked, wiped clean of content, or otherwise rendered useless.  Some savvy law enforcement agencies have taken to using Faraday Bags, which prohibit remote access to the electronic device placed inside the protective bag.  Many Faraday Bags have windows so that content may be visually accessed without compromising the security of the device.

[9] Id at 43.

[10] Interestingly, the California legislature passed a bill (Senate Bill 914) in 2011 which would have required police to obtain a search warrant before searching content of any portable electronic device.  Governor Jerry Brown vetoed the bill and deferred to the courts as the best avenue to resolve case-specific issues related to search and seizure.